Computer Science In MDTSA

Computer science is here to stay and is defining many students brighter futures. Students who have been engaging the CS track in recent years are coming out of college further ahead of their peers in salary but also finding jobs even before they graduate! Graduates in CS are taught a way of thinking that not only involves computer skills but mainly focus on a type of thinking that creates amazing professionals geared up to be the best in the workforce. MDTSA is producing leading edge competitive events for students to showcase their skills in CS. Students are given the opportunity to compete against others in areas like coding, cyber-security, technology problem solving, and many more! Below are some of the standards CS curriculum covers and how our events link to those standards.

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Materials Needed to Start a CS Focused TSA Chapter

Materials needed to start a CS focused chapter is the basic items to teach a technology based computer science focused classroom; computers, robotic systems and electrical components. Not all of the events below needs all of the materials, in-fact, some of the events do not require any of the above materials. Some of the events are public speaking based but can be geared toward addressing areas in CS. As your chapter grows so can the material types, amounts, and quality. Start small and work forward with a group of students who are passionate about being successful.

Computer Science Standards and Events

  • Computing Systems

    • Hardware & Software

      • Designing or selection of a system involves many considerations and tradeoffs.

      • MIDDLE SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Electrical Applications - Participants (one [1] team of two [2] individuals per chapter) take a written test of basic electrical and electronic theory. Semifinalists assemble a specific circuit from a schematic diagram using their own kit and make required electrical measurements, and explain their solution during an interview.

        • Inventions and Innovations - Participants (one [1] team of at least three [3] individuals per chapter; one [1] entry per team) investigate and determine the need for an invention or innovation of a device, system, or process, and then brainstorm ideas for a possible solution. Semifinalists make an oral presentation to a panel of judges (who act as venture capitalist investors) to persuade the panel to invest in their invention/innovation.

        • Junior Solar Sprint (JSS) - Participants (one [1] team of two to four [2-4] per chapter, one [1] entry per team) apply STEM concepts, creativity, teamwork, and problem-solving skills as they design, construct, and race a solar-powered model car.

        • Microcontroller Design - Participants (one [1] team of three to five [3-5] individuals per chapter) develop a working digital device (product) with real-world applications. Through a multimedia presentation, product demonstration, and documentation, the team demonstrates in detail its knowledge of microcontroller programming, simple circuitry, and product design and marketing. The project should have educational and social value, and conform to the theme for the year.

        • System Control Technology - Participants(one [1] team of three [3] individuals per state may participate, one [1)] entry per team) use a team approach to develop a computer-controlled model solution to a given problem, typically one based on an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and leave instructions for judges to operate the device.

      • HIGH SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Animatronics - Participants (one [1] team per chapter) demonstrate knowledge of mechanical and control systems by designing, fabricating, and controlling an animatronics device that will communicate, entertain, inform, demonstrate and/or illustrate a topic, idea, subject, or concept. Sound, lights, and a surrounding environment must accompany the device.

        • Engineering Design - Participants (three [3] teams of three to six [3 - 6] members per state) develop a solution to a National Academy of Engineering grand challenge that is posted on the national TSA website. The solution offered will be informed and designed by precise problem definition, thorough research, creativity, experimentation (when possible), and the development of documents and appropriate models (mathematical, graphical, and/or physical prototype/model). Semifinalist teams present and defend their proposed solution to a panel of judges.

        • System Control Technology - Participants (one [1] team of three [3] members per state) work on site to develop a computer-controlled model-solution to a problem, typically one from an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and write instructions for evaluators to operate the device.

    • Troubleshooting

      • Knowing how systems work together to synthesize a solution to a problem or system.

      • MIDDLE SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Coding - Participants (one [1] team of two [2] members per chapter) will demonstrate their knowledge of computer science and coding by taking a written test. Semifinalists will further demonstrate their programming knowledge by participating in an onsite programming challenge.

        • Inventions and Innovations - Participants (one [1] team of at least three [3] individuals per chapter; one [1] entry per team) investigate and determine the need for an invention or innovation of a device, system, or process, and then brainstorm ideas for a possible solution. Semifinalists make an oral presentation to a panel of judges (who act as venture capitalist investors) to persuade the panel to invest in their invention/innovation.

        • Microcontroller Design - Participants (one [1] team of three to five [3-5] individuals per chapter) develop a working digital device (product) with real-world applications. Through a multimedia presentation, product demonstration, and documentation, the team demonstrates in detail its knowledge of microcontroller programming, simple circuitry, and product design and marketing. The project should have educational and social value, and conform to the theme for the year.

        • System Control Technology - Participants(one [1] team of three [3] individuals per state may participate, one [1)] entry per team) use a team approach to develop a computer-controlled model solution to a given problem, typically one based on an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and leave instructions for judges to operate the device.

      • HIGH SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Animatronics - Participants (one [1] team per chapter) demonstrate knowledge of mechanical and control systems by designing, fabricating, and controlling an animatronics device that will communicate, entertain, inform, demonstrate and/or illustrate a topic, idea, subject, or concept. Sound, lights, and a surrounding environment must accompany the device.

        • Coding - Participants (one [1] individual, or one [1] team of two [2] members, per chapter) respond to an annual coding-related design challenge by developing a software program that will accurately address an on-site problem in a specified, limited amount of time.

        • Engineering Design - Participants (three [3] teams of three to six [3 - 6] members per state) develop a solution to a National Academy of Engineering grand challenge that is posted on the national TSA website. The solution offered will be informed and designed by precise problem definition, thorough research, creativity, experimentation (when possible), and the development of documents and appropriate models (mathematical, graphical, and/or physical prototype/model). Semifinalist teams present and defend their proposed solution to a panel of judges.

        • Software Development - Participants (one [1] team per chapter) use knowledge of cutting-edge technologies, algorithm design, problem-solving principles, effective communication, and collaborative teamwork to design, implement, test, and document a software development project of educational or social value.

        • System Control Technology - Participants (one [1] team of three [3] members per state) work on site to develop a computer-controlled model-solution to a problem, typically one from an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and write instructions for evaluators to operate the device.

  • Networks and the Internet

    • Cybersecurity

      • Analyzing traffic and encryption in a network to design, build, program or uphold security measures to safeguard the system online.

      • MIDDLE SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • CyberSecurity

        • Essays on Technology - Participants (three [3] individuals per state) conduct research on specified subtopics of a broader technological area and, using the knowledge and resources gained through that research, write a comprehensive essay on one subtopic that is designated onsite.

      • HIGH SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • CyberSecurity

        • Essays on Technology - Participants (three [3] individuals per state) write a research-based essay (using two or more sources provided on-site) that makes insightful connections about a current technological topic.

  • Data and Analysis

    • Collection

      • Designing the human or automating the collection of data

      • MIDDLE SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Coding - Participants (one [1] team of two [2] members per chapter) will demonstrate their knowledge of computer science and coding by taking a written test. Semifinalists will further demonstrate their programming knowledge by participating in an onsite programming challenge.

        • Microcontroller Design - Participants (one [1] team of three to five [3-5] individuals per chapter) develop a working digital device (product) with real-world applications. Through a multimedia presentation, product demonstration, and documentation, the team demonstrates in detail its knowledge of microcontroller programming, simple circuitry, and product design and marketing. The project should have educational and social value, and conform to the theme for the year.

      • HIGH SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Coding - Participants (one [1] individual, or one [1] team of two [2] members, per chapter) respond to an annual coding-related design challenge by developing a software program that will accurately address an on-site problem in a specified, limited amount of time.

        • Engineering Design - Participants (three [3] teams of three to six [3 - 6] members per state) develop a solution to a National Academy of Engineering grand challenge that is posted on the national TSA website. The solution offered will be informed and designed by precise problem definition, thorough research, creativity, experimentation (when possible), and the development of documents and appropriate models (mathematical, graphical, and/or physical prototype/model). Semifinalist teams present and defend their proposed solution to a panel of judges.

        • Software Development - Participants (one [1] team per chapter) use knowledge of cutting-edge technologies, algorithm design, problem-solving principles, effective communication, and collaborative teamwork to design, implement, test, and document a software development project of educational or social value.

    • Inference & Models

      • Designing and using models to evaluate data, events theories and/or inferences.

      • MIDDLE SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Inventions and Innovations - Participants (one [1] team of at least three [3] individuals per chapter; one [1] entry per team) investigate and determine the need for an invention or innovation of a device, system, or process, and then brainstorm ideas for a possible solution. Semifinalists make an oral presentation to a panel of judges (who act as venture capitalist investors) to persuade the panel to invest in their invention/innovation.

        • Microcontroller Design - Participants (one [1] team of three to five [3-5] individuals per chapter) develop a working digital device (product) with real-world applications. Through a multimedia presentation, product demonstration, and documentation, the team demonstrates in detail its knowledge of microcontroller programming, simple circuitry, and product design and marketing. The project should have educational and social value, and conform to the theme for the year.

      • HIGH SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Engineering Design - Participants (three [3] teams of three to six [3 - 6] members per state) develop a solution to a National Academy of Engineering grand challenge that is posted on the national TSA website. The solution offered will be informed and designed by precise problem definition, thorough research, creativity, experimentation (when possible), and the development of documents and appropriate models (mathematical, graphical, and/or physical prototype/model). Semifinalist teams present and defend their proposed solution to a panel of judges.

        • Software Development - Participants (one [1] team per chapter) use knowledge of cutting-edge technologies, algorithm design, problem-solving principles, effective communication, and collaborative teamwork to design, implement, test, and document a software development project of educational or social value.

  • Algorithms & Programming

    • Algorithms

      • Designing algorithms that are readable, easy to follow/test and quick to debug

      • MIDDLE SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Coding - Participants (one [1] team of two [2] members per chapter) will demonstrate their knowledge of computer science and coding by taking a written test. Semifinalists will further demonstrate their programming knowledge by participating in an onsite programming challenge.

        • Inventions and Innovations - Participants (one [1] team of at least three [3] individuals per chapter; one [1] entry per team) investigate and determine the need for an invention or innovation of a device, system, or process, and then brainstorm ideas for a possible solution. Semifinalists make an oral presentation to a panel of judges (who act as venture capitalist investors) to persuade the panel to invest in their invention/innovation.

        • System Control Technology - Participants(one [1] team of three [3] individuals per state may participate, one [1)] entry per team) use a team approach to develop a computer-controlled model solution to a given problem, typically one based on an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and leave instructions for judges to operate the device.

      • HIGH SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Coding - Participants (one [1] individual, or one [1] team of two [2] members, per chapter) respond to an annual coding-related design challenge by developing a software program that will accurately address an on-site problem in a specified, limited amount of time.

        • Software Development - Participants (one [1] team per chapter) use knowledge of cutting-edge technologies, algorithm design, problem-solving principles, effective communication, and collaborative teamwork to design, implement, test, and document a software development project of educational or social value.

        • System Control Technology - Participants (one [1] team of three [3] members per state) work on site to develop a computer-controlled model-solution to a problem, typically one from an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and write instructions for evaluators to operate the device.

    • Variables

      • Using variables to store data for display, later use or manipulation.

      • MIDDLE SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Coding - Participants (one [1] team of two [2] members per chapter) will demonstrate their knowledge of computer science and coding by taking a written test. Semifinalists will further demonstrate their programming knowledge by participating in an onsite programming challenge.

        • Inventions and Innovations - Participants (one [1] team of at least three [3] individuals per chapter; one [1] entry per team) investigate and determine the need for an invention or innovation of a device, system, or process, and then brainstorm ideas for a possible solution. Semifinalists make an oral presentation to a panel of judges (who act as venture capitalist investors) to persuade the panel to invest in their invention/innovation.

        • System Control Technology - Participants(one [1] team of three [3] individuals per state may participate, one [1)] entry per team) use a team approach to develop a computer-controlled model solution to a given problem, typically one based on an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and leave instructions for judges to operate the device.

      • HIGH SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Coding - Participants (one [1] individual, or one [1] team of two [2] members, per chapter) respond to an annual coding-related design challenge by developing a software program that will accurately address an on-site problem in a specified, limited amount of time.

        • Software Development - Participants (one [1] team per chapter) use knowledge of cutting-edge technologies, algorithm design, problem-solving principles, effective communication, and collaborative teamwork to design, implement, test, and document a software development project of educational or social value.

        • System Control Technology - Participants (one [1] team of three [3] members per state) work on site to develop a computer-controlled model-solution to a problem, typically one from an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and write instructions for evaluators to operate the device.

    • Control

      • Create more complex behaviors using loops, handlers or conditionals.

      • MIDDLE SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Coding - Participants (one [1] team of two [2] members per chapter) will demonstrate their knowledge of computer science and coding by taking a written test. Semifinalists will further demonstrate their programming knowledge by participating in an onsite programming challenge.

        • Inventions and Innovations - Participants (one [1] team of at least three [3] individuals per chapter; one [1] entry per team) investigate and determine the need for an invention or innovation of a device, system, or process, and then brainstorm ideas for a possible solution. Semifinalists make an oral presentation to a panel of judges (who act as venture capitalist investors) to persuade the panel to invest in their invention/innovation.

        • System Control Technology - Participants(one [1] team of three [3] individuals per state may participate, one [1)] entry per team) use a team approach to develop a computer-controlled model solution to a given problem, typically one based on an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and leave instructions for judges to operate the device.

      • HIGH SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Coding - Participants (one [1] individual, or one [1] team of two [2] members, per chapter) respond to an annual coding-related design challenge by developing a software program that will accurately address an on-site problem in a specified, limited amount of time.

        • Software Development - Participants (one [1] team per chapter) use knowledge of cutting-edge technologies, algorithm design, problem-solving principles, effective communication, and collaborative teamwork to design, implement, test, and document a software development project of educational or social value.

        • System Control Technology - Participants (one [1] team of three [3] members per state) work on site to develop a computer-controlled model-solution to a problem, typically one from an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and write instructions for evaluators to operate the device.

    • Program Development

      • Design a program based on the needs of a user or problem.

      • MIDDLE SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Coding - Participants (one [1] team of two [2] members per chapter) will demonstrate their knowledge of computer science and coding by taking a written test. Semifinalists will further demonstrate their programming knowledge by participating in an onsite programming challenge.

        • Inventions and Innovations - Participants (one [1] team of at least three [3] individuals per chapter; one [1] entry per team) investigate and determine the need for an invention or innovation of a device, system, or process, and then brainstorm ideas for a possible solution. Semifinalists make an oral presentation to a panel of judges (who act as venture capitalist investors) to persuade the panel to invest in their invention/innovation.

        • System Control Technology - Participants(one [1] team of three [3] individuals per state may participate, one [1)] entry per team) use a team approach to develop a computer-controlled model solution to a given problem, typically one based on an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and leave instructions for judges to operate the device.

      • HIGH SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Coding - Participants (one [1] individual, or one [1] team of two [2] members, per chapter) respond to an annual coding-related design challenge by developing a software program that will accurately address an on-site problem in a specified, limited amount of time.

        • Engineering Design - Participants (three [3] teams of three to six [3 - 6] members per state) develop a solution to a National Academy of Engineering grand challenge that is posted on the national TSA website. The solution offered will be informed and designed by precise problem definition, thorough research, creativity, experimentation (when possible), and the development of documents and appropriate models (mathematical, graphical, and/or physical prototype/model). Semifinalist teams present and defend their proposed solution to a panel of judges.

        • Software Development - Participants (one [1] team per chapter) use knowledge of cutting-edge technologies, algorithm design, problem-solving principles, effective communication, and collaborative teamwork to design, implement, test, and document a software development project of educational or social value.

        • System Control Technology - Participants (one [1] team of three [3] members per state) work on site to develop a computer-controlled model-solution to a problem, typically one from an industrial setting. Teams analyze the problem, build a computer-controlled mechanical model, program the model, explain the program and mechanical features of the model-solution, and write instructions for evaluators to operate the device.

  • Impacts of Computing

    • Culture

      • Impacts of technology changes society, what are the tradeoffs and how can they be addressed.

      • MIDDLE SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Essays on Technology - Participants (three [3] individuals per state) conduct research on specified subtopics of a broader technological area and, using the knowledge and resources gained through that research, write a comprehensive essay on one subtopic that is designated onsite.

      • HIGH SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Debating Technological Issues - Participants (three [3] teams of two [2] members per state) work together to prepare for a debate against a team from another chapter. The teams will be instructed to take either the Pro or Con side of a selected subtopic.

        • Essays on Technology - Participants (three [3] individuals per state) write a research-based essay (using two or more sources provided on-site) that makes insightful connections about a current technological topic.

        • Extemporaneous Speech - Participants (three [3] individuals per state) verbally communicate their knowledge of technology or TSA subjects by giving a speech after having drawn a card on which a technology or TSA topic is written.

    • Social Interactions

      • Addressing the issues around how technology effects the social interactions of humans.

      • MIDDLE SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Essays on Technology - Participants (three [3] individuals per state) conduct research on specified subtopics of a broader technological area and, using the knowledge and resources gained through that research, write a comprehensive essay on one subtopic that is designated onsite.

      • HIGH SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Animatronics - Participants (one [1] team per chapter) demonstrate knowledge of mechanical and control systems by designing, fabricating, and controlling an animatronics device that will communicate, entertain, inform, demonstrate and/or illustrate a topic, idea, subject, or concept. Sound, lights, and a surrounding environment must accompany the device.

        • Debating Technological Issues - Participants (three [3] teams of two [2] members per state) work together to prepare for a debate against a team from another chapter. The teams will be instructed to take either the Pro or Con side of a selected subtopic.

        • Essays on Technology - Participants (three [3] individuals per state) write a research-based essay (using two or more sources provided on-site) that makes insightful connections about a current technological topic.

        • Extemporaneous Speech - Participants (three [3] individuals per state) verbally communicate their knowledge of technology or TSA subjects by giving a speech after having drawn a card on which a technology or TSA topic is written.

    • Safety, Law, and Ethics

      • Keeping information private vs public has tradeoffs and impacts, how do those impact humans usage? Addressing how humans can be tricked into making private data public.

      • MIDDLE SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Challenging Technology Issues - Participants (three [3] teams of two [2] individuals per state) work together to prepare and deliver a debate-style presentation with participants explaining opposing views of a current technology issue.

        • Essays on Technology - Participants (three [3] individuals per state) conduct research on specified subtopics of a broader technological area and, using the knowledge and resources gained through that research, write a comprehensive essay on one subtopic that is designated onsite.

      • HIGH SCHOOL EVENTS:

        • Debating Technological Issues - Participants (three [3] teams of two [2] members per state) work together to prepare for a debate against a team from another chapter. The teams will be instructed to take either the Pro or Con side of a selected subtopic.

        • Essays on Technology - Participants (three [3] individuals per state) write a research-based essay (using two or more sources provided on-site) that makes insightful connections about a current technological topic.

        • Extemporaneous Speech - Participants (three [3] individuals per state) verbally communicate their knowledge of technology or TSA subjects by giving a speech after having drawn a card on which a technology or TSA topic is written.


 

Computer science standards provided by: K12 Computer Science Framework - https://k12cs.org/framework-statements-by-grade-band/#jump-6-8